Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘music’ Category

Here’s the link to my new article on Medium!

View at Medium.com

View at Medium.com

Read Full Post »

Sometimes, a song just sparks a whole memory and the feels that come with it. Here’s one I’ll share with you.

I like to listen to music when I make dinner and tonight, “Me and Bobby McGee” by Janis Joplin came on. I was instantly transported to the late 90s when I was working on Firestone Farm at Greenfield Village. There were a group of us young girls who were between 20-25 and a group of more mature women who were our mamas. We called all of them “Mama”, it was just that way then. We had a good thing going.

Anyway, one morning as we were getting ready for visitors, Mama Linda, a dear lovely person with children in high school at the time, just belted out, “Me and Bobby McGee”, beautifully. She stopped after the first verse, a little embarrassed, but we egged her on until she picked it back up again and finished out the song. We were blown away, this tiny lady perfectly channeling Janis while wearing an 1880s farm dress, her hair braided in a bun. It was amazing and I’ll never forget that day. By the way, those days were twenty years ago and I still call her Mama Linda.

These days, I’m grabbing onto whatever positive things that I can and holding them in my heart. Music comes from the soul and entwines with our memories for our life soundtrack. “Me and Bobby McGee” fits in nicely to mine. Tell me your story that comes from a song and a memory.

Much love to you all.

Read Full Post »

Exactly two months ago, the night of February 17, I was so excited. The next morning, I would board my plane to Boston and begin my mini-adventure in Salem.  I was packed and ready. barely able to fall asleep. I remember it well. At that point, COVID-19 was the furthest thing from my mind. Little did I know

Fast forward to now. It’s only been two months since my trip, but it seems like years ago. Travel isn’t even on the radar at the moment. There have been some really rough days, I’ll admit. Emotions have run the gamut: Fear, inspiration, hope, anger (this past week, especially), frustration, all ramped up due to the situation.

I’m trying not to let my OCD and anxiety run away with those negative emotions, going round and round in my brain for hours without stopping. It’s times like these when I seriously rethink my therapist’s offer of medication. I’m not going to lie, Wednesday was really difficult, watching people completely disregard safety regulations, getting out of cars and clumping together, with such ugliness, waving Confederate flags and white power signs that had nothing to do with what they were supposedly protesting. Just for the record, I believe in the right to peaceful protest; I do NOT believe that we have the right to put other people in danger by potentially exposing them to a deadly disease (including children, OMG!!! There were several children there!), clogging up streets and honking horns for EIGHT HOURS around a Level 1 trauma hospital where there are tons of sick people, children, and a maternity ward. WTF??? Seriously, what is wrong with people? Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. That’s all I’m going to say on that matter, so trolls, step off. Don’t even try to defend that mess,

That being said, there are many positive things about this social isolation episode that I am focusing on. Such as:

  • Family time. Youngest Child is a brilliant musician and he’s been teaching (forcing) me to learn piano chords. I can already read music, I sing and play the flute/piccolo/tin whistle, but my piano experience has been limited to very simple tunes. Now, I’m learning some really cool stuff. He’s also helping me with learning ukulele. I always wanted to play and, of course, he knows how. We’ve been watching a lot of movies as a family, eating dinner together every night, and playing games. Yes, we get tired of each other and need some alone time, but for the most part, I love spending more time with Marty and Youngest Child. (Oldest lives on his own now, two hours away, and Middle is in his apartment at school since he has better internet and still has an active lease.)
  • Sleeping in. We’re working, Marty teaches, too, but no more 6:00 am wake-up times for us. School starts when we want it to. We’re honestly working a lot of hours, more than we normally do, but we have sleep. Yay!
  • I’m writing regularly. I finished the yet-unnamed sequel to Traveler, began another book, and plan to begin editing (and naming) the sequel this week. I’m also writing a lot more blog posts, in case you haven’t noticed.
  • Languages. I’ve dusted off my Italian and French and am going full-force on Duolingo. It’s awesome. Future plans…
  • I’m starting my Shakespeare garden indoors with seeds. See my Shakespeare Garden post for more on that. It’s so cool, watching everything sprout!
  • Zoom meetings. Two months ago, I couldn’t have told you what Zoom was. Now I use it every day. It helps me to stay connected to my theatre family and my church family. I truly don’t know what I’d do without it. I even get to have my therapy appointment online, which is very much needed.

Now, with things looking a bit better with this stupid virus running its course, there’s a little light shining at the end of the tunnel, if people don’t screw it up and start a giant second wave. We (myself included) need to focus more on the positive, not to ignore the problems, but to keep things from getting very dark.

In the comments, share a positive with me, some bright spot in this dark time, no matter where in the world you are. I want to celebrate with you!

Read Full Post »

Unless you’ve been meditating in the desert for weeks like Jared Leto, you know that we are in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. How long will this last? No one knows, but we can make it better by doing what is recommended: staying away from people as much as possible and washing our hands. It seems trivial to some, but my dear friend in Italy has seen just how bad this is. She and her family are fine, thank God, but so many are not. There are hundreds of deaths every day in places where there used to be such joy. I watch video from Rome, Florence, and Venice and remember how full of life those cities were when I visited just five years ago. The streets are empty, the obituaries are many. This is serious business, folks.

I don’t think I really have to explain the term “social distancing” since the entire world is doing it. If you’re not right now, you should be so we can get rid of this stupid virus and hug people again. I don’t know about you, but I miss hugging my friends. I hug Marty, obviously, but he does not want to be hugged all the time. Hugging Youngest Child is like trying to hug a rock right right now and he makes funny noises when I do. It will be good to hug other people again. Someday.

Like everyone else, we’re trying to find things to fill all of the extra time at home. Of course, there are always things that should be done, but aren’t pleasant. I’m forcing myself to do some of that. Things like scrubbing the kitchen cabinets. Or individually dusting all of the books in a bookshelf and then moving the bookshelf to clean the years of dust bunnies behind and underneath. I know, I know, I’m enjoying myself way too much, but it has to be done. Sigh. Sidenote: I hate cleaning. I keep a (mostly) clean house because, well, I don’t want to live in a dirty house and I love it when the house is clean, but I actually hate the process. I used to think I was a domestic person, but I’ve come to realize that I’m not. My mantra is, “Someday, I will hire a maid.”

Youngest Child has also decided that we are going to work out this entire time and that my running and sit-ups aren’t enough, oh, no. In the spirit of Jillian Michaels, he has added push-ups to my routine, six sets of an increasing number every night with a minute rest in between each set. Last night, I made it to six sets of seven. I hurt now. Marty wryly watches me struggle from the couch as the six-foot-tall teenager says that it’s good for us, that we’re going to be “ripped” this summer. Tonight, I’ll be up to six sets of eight. I don’t like push-ups.

Marty and I are also teaching remotely from home, which has been an interesting experience. We have apps that we can use to help us assign work and the students are familiar with the apps, but getting all 100+ of them to go online and do the assigned work is some of the problem. Most are, and they’re doing a great job, but some have limited internet access, even though the school lent out laptops to those who needed one. There are also others who are choosing to not do anything. We are grading their assignments, but at this point, the grades don’t count. The behavior management part of this has been FABULOUS, though. I haven’t written anyone up of kicked them out of my class in a week, although I did turn off a kid’s camera on Zoom yesterday for flipping everyone off. I was not shocked at who did the flipping off, either. It’ll be interesting to see where this all goes in the coming weeks.

There is no theatre right now. That’s something I’m super sad about, as are many people that I know. My cast and I were at least able to perform one weekend of The Glass Menagerie with wonderful reviews before we got shut down and there’s still a possibility that we could have one more performance to record, with no audience, and a cast photo once things settle down. Other theatres around here didn’t even get to open their March shows at all. Many are postponed until at least May or are cancelled outright. And that really, really sucks. I don’t want to get too deeply into that because I’m still having a hard time dealing with it. I know that there are many others in the same boat, but that doesn’t make it any easier. In the meantime, I’m still going over my lines every day, just in case.

With no theatre, I’m trying to focus back on writing, which is a good thing. I’m very close to finishing my sequel to Traveler (which is, by the way, available on Amazon. Hint hint.) and I have have a couple of other projects going as well.

I’m also focusing more on meditation. I’m very much in a learning frame of mind with metaphysical things and this has been a great time to explore, really be quiet, and let it happen. More on that later.

There’s time to read for fun again. I have a long way to go before I catch up to where Marty is, but I’ll try. I have about five books that I’m reading simultaneously at the moment.

Oh! I’m also planning my garden. I’m making a Shakespeare garden, kind of a big deal, with plants that Shakespeare references in his works. There will be a lot of new landscaping and I ordered a bunch of seeds that should be here any time now. I’ll post before and after pictures when things actually begin growing. Marty is scared.

So, what are you doing during this time? Drop a message in the comments or give this post a like. I’d love to hear from you. Reading comments gives me an excuse to not clean the basement.

Stay safe, everyone.

Read Full Post »

When I was a kid, I had a Magnus Chord organ (look it up) that used to be my mom’s. I loved that thing. It had a short keyboard to be played with the right hand, I can’t remember how many keys, and buttons that produced accompanying chords that were played with the left hand. The minor chords were my favorite. There were music books written specifically for the Magnus Chord organ and I played it all the time, especially between the ages of 7-10 or so.

One of my favorite types of music to play, and sing, was Christmas music. Like, in the summertime. Also in the spring, the fall, and in the long winter months after Christmas. I also listened to year-round Christmas music on my record player. Gene Autry, Burl Ives, The Carpenters. When we got the Avon Christmas tape, I was in heaven. I adored the melodies. the words, the sacred feel of it all. I still do. Of course, I was allowed to listen to it in my room, but playing it in the living room or in the car was taboo until Thanksgiving Day when Santa was given the key to the City of Detroit during the Thanksgiving Parade.

I still pretty much do that, the only exception is when we begin to practice Christmas choir music in October. The difference is that now, I don’t sing or play Christmas music on my own throughout the year like I used to. What changed? I’m not sure, but the best guess I can muster is that it just started to feel less special. I noticed myself getting sick of Christmas music by the time the holiday actually got here and that made me sad. I wanted Christmas to feel special again. Plus, now, it just doesn’t feel right until it gets closer and colder outside. Sometimes, it doesn’t even feel special, then. The feeling has to be just right.

This year, two radio stations that I normally listen to began playing Christmas music on November 1. I’m not upset about it, but I won’t be listening to them again until Thanksgiving. It’ll be great then; Nat King Cole can sing “The Christmas Song” and “The First Noel” 500 times in those four weeks and I’ll happily sing along at the top of my lungs. (Not Mariah Carey, though. I WILL change the station when she comes on.)

Again, I LOVE Christmas music and I have nothing against anyone who wants to start early, I just need it to be closer to actual Christmas.

Enjoy the holiday season, everyone!

Read Full Post »